Source

Synopsis

  • Contracting the abdomen while exhaling, in various orientations towards gravity (on all fours, prone, supine, supine with pelvis lifted, prone with sidelying etc)

ay21_thumbs.jpg

Lesson Outline

  • Highly condensed outline of key movements

Insights and Focus of Teaching

  • Instead of seeing this lesson as a breathing lesson, we can view it as a way to study and investigate into how breathing is done (a quote I found in a recording of New Dwelle 2006 / Munich City training)
  • Dr. Prof. Stuart McGill identified the Rectus Abdominis as the important muscle for spine stabilisation (on the front side). He says that there is no scientific evidence to be found whatsoever that the Transverse Abdominis is a stabilizer to the spine (lower back). Even though some fitness professionals claim it to be so - there seems to be no study supporting this claim.
  • Differentiation between Obliques, Transverse Abdominis, and Rectus Abdominis
    external image Illu_trunk_muscles.jpg
  • To realize which of the abs muscles are needed for breathing, and which for lifting the head

Related ATMs

  • Pelvis Clock
  • Minimal Lifting
  • Seesaw breathing

Resources

More Insights (ideas, principles, strategies, experiences, ...

  • Youtube comments from Marincxr: He is inhaling with a closed glottis wich causes the diaphragm to contract and suck in the abdominal cavity. The transversus abdominus are mucles used for expiration during exercise. The diaphragm is the main muscle (There are other mucles that conribute like intercostals , scalenes and sternocleidomastoid) used in the process of inspiration or breathing in and if done with a closed glottis causes this effect.The tranverse abdominus is used in forced expiration not inspiration. The transversus abdominus is used exclusively in forced expiration so how is he training it while doing a vacuum.
  • I took a stop watch to my breathing:
    stop_watch_supine.jpg
  • Dr. Ludwig Schmitt, the great german doctor and author of the book "Atemheilkunst" identified 18 groups of muscles that have to play together in breathing (the pelvic floor being just one of them).
    rib-cage-600.jpg


- AlfonsGrabher AlfonsGrabher Dec 3, 2014




Disclaimer: This site is for sharing information about Feldenkrais® Awareness Through Movement® lessons. The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. Nothing on Feldy Notebook should be construed as an attempt to offer medical advice or treatment.

All contributions to this website are licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution Share-Alike 3.0 License. Do not add any copyrighted information to this website. Feldy Notebook is sponsored by Kinetic Inquiry.